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9/25/2018  |   11:30 AM - 12:00 PM   |  Diamond Ballroom II

Congenital Cytomegalovirus and Hearing Loss: How Much Do Otologists and Pediatric Otolaryngologists Know?

Introduction: Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is the most common congenital infection worldwide and the leading environmental cause of pediatric hearing loss (HL). The objective of this study is to evaluate both pediatric otolaryngologists, neurotologists, and otologists on awareness and knowledge of cCMV. Methods: An electronic multiple-choice questionnaire was sent to physician members of The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) and American Otological Society (AOS). The survey assessed demographics, physician awareness and practice patterns. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: Seventy pediatric otolaryngologists and otologists responded. All were familiar with cCMV. Most were familiar with symptoms associated with cCMV with the exception of petechia/purpura. The incidence of HL in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cCMV was correctly identified 38.6% and 30%, respectively. Only 47% respondents knew cCMV is the leading environmental cause of HL. Only 44% knew hearing impaired cCMV can lead to progressive HL. Less than half knew the time-line of dried blood spot testing for diagnosing cCMV; 63% correctly identified timing for urine/saliva testing. Most rarely/never (57%) incorporated cCMV testing in HL management. Only 21% offered antiviral treatment or infectious disease consultation for a symptomatic child. Most respondents either did not know the cCMV screening policy or did not have one at their respective institution. Conclusion: This is the first study to exclusively look at cCMV awareness amongst otolaryngologists. Our findings demonstrate the need for further education directives focused on cCMV. As physicians directly involved in managing HL, otolaryngologists must have better knowledge of cCMV, in order to serve as better advocates for this vulnerable patient population.

  • Acknowledge the urgency to definitively diagnose congenital CMV
  • Understand why it is important for otolaryngologists to have a better grasp on cCMV
  • What are the methods of definitive diagnosis for cCMV

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Kavita Dedhia (Primary Presenter,Author), kdedhia@emory.edu;
I am an assistant professor at Emory University. I work in the department of pediatric otolaryngology. I completed a fellowship in both pediatric otolaryngology and otology. I specialize in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of children with hearing loss.

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.




Albert Park (Co-Author), albert.park@hsc.utah.edu;
Dr. Park is the chief for Pediatric Otolaryngology at the University of Utah. He is the principal investigator for an NIH funded multi-institutional clinical trial to determine whether the antiviral drug, valganciclovir can improve hearing outcomes for children with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a very common and understudied cause of childhood hearing loss.He also established a CMV working group comprising of pediatric genetics, infectious disease, otolaryngology, audiology, neurology, department of health and ARUP laboratories to streamline clinical and research initiatives in this field.

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives support from NIH.