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8/22/2022  |   3:30 PM - 3:55 PM   |  Governor General III

Universal cCMV Screening: Newborn Saliva Collection from Six Minnesota Hospitals

Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is the most common congenital viral infection and yet most pregnant mothers have never heard of it before. The majority of newborns with cCMV appear healthy at birth, but a portion are at risk for developing health problems, including hearing loss. There is a limited timeframe in determining if a newborn has a congenital versus acquired infection, thus universal screening of newborns in the postpartum setting is optimal for early intervention. Through a large study, across six metro hospitals we aim to determine the best sample source for detecting cCMV to fit the newborn screening paradigm. One possible method under consideration is saliva. Since 2016, we have enrolled over 22,000 families into a CDC-funded research study comparing dried bloodspot sensitivity and saliva for cCMV. We will share our experiences talking with families at time of collection, performing universal saliva specimen collection and shipping processes at study sites. Topics included are timing, consenter availability with parent availability, controlling humidity for swab storage, and increased parental anxiety with premature and NICU newborns. Lessons learned and ideas for future saliva testing will be discussed.

  • Describe questions parents have about cCMV screening and information needed to address them.
  • Identify procedural advantages and disadvantages of newborn saliva swab collection in a universal screening paradigm.
  • Name methods for improving saliva collection.

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Session Evaluation


Emily Graupmann (POC-Point of Contact,Primary Presenter), graup052@umn.edu;
Emily is a Clinical Research Coordinator in the Pediatrics Department at the University of Minnesota. In 2014, she graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with her BA in biology. After graduation, she started in clinical research at the University of Minnesota, mainly coordinating pediatric infectious disease studies. Recently she has had the opportunity to explore other specialties and help with new projects.

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.




Whitney Wunderlich (Primary Presenter), whitney.wunderlich@allina.com;
Whitney Wunderlich is a Senior Research Associate at Allina Health in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She works in Care Delivery Research with a focus on Mother Baby research.

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.