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9/26/2014  |   11:15 AM - 11:45 AM   |  Wyoming

Saliva is the Preferred Sample for Congenital Cytomegalovirus Diagnosis

Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common congenital infection. Although urine is considered is the sample of choice and tissue culture isolation of the virus is the gold standard for diagnosis, this method is labor intensive and time consuming. The aim of this study is to determine if real-time PCR assay of saliva specimens, shown to be useful for screening newborns, performs equally well for the diagnosis of congenital CMV infection. Methods: Infants born at seven hospitals in the U.S. were screened for congenital CMV infection by rapid culture of saliva samples as part of the NIDCD CHIMES study. Infants positive on screening were enrolled in follow-up to confirm congenital infection by rapid culture of urine and saliva. A 5 ┬ÁL aliquot of saliva or urine was used directly as template in a real-time PCR assay without the DNA extraction step. The results of rapid culture and real-time PCR were compared. Results: Between March 2007 and March 2012, 100,332 infants were screened for congenital CMV and 462 were enrolled in the follow-up component of the study. Among these, 80 infants had both saliva and urine samples obtained within the first 3 weeks of life. Urine PCR Urine Rapid Culture Saliva PCR Positive Negative Total Saliva Rapid Culture Positive Negative Total Positive 79 1 80 Positive 74 4 78 Negative 0 0 0 Negative 2 0 2 Total 79 1 80 Total 76 4 80 P=0.68 Conclusions: PCR of urine or saliva is equivalent to rapid culture for congenital CMV diagnosis. However, saliva samples are easier to collect than urine making them the preferred sample for screening and diagnosis of congenital CMV infection.

Shannon A. Ross (Primary Presenter), sross@peds.uab.edu;
Dr. Ross is an Associate Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases, in the Department of Pediatrics and a Co-Investigator for the NIDCD CHIMES Study.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Grants for Other activities from GSK.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Swetha Pinninti (Author), spinninti@peds.uab.edu;
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Amina Ahmed (Author), Amina.Ahmed@carolinashealthcare.org;
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April Palmer (Author), apalmer@umc.edu;
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Marian Michaels (Author), Marian.Michaels@chp.edu;
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Pablo Sanchez (Author), Pablo.Sanchez@nationwidechildrens.org;
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David Bernstein (Author), David.Bernstein@cchmc.org;
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Robert Tolan (Author), n/a;
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Zdenek Novak (Author), znovak@peds.uab.edu;
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Nazma Chowdhury (Author), nchowdhury@peds.uab.edu;
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Karen B. Fowler (Author), kfowler@uab.edu;
Dr. Fowler is a Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases in the Department of Pediatrics and the Co-Director of the NIDCD CHIMES Study.

Suresh Boppana (Author), sboppana@peds.uab.edu;
Dr. Boppana is a Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases in the Department of Pediatrics and the PI of the NIDCD CHIMES Study.

Presentation:
328Shannon A.Ross.pdf

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